Quibi shares some clues about how its app might work

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  • Quibi shares some clues about how its app might work

    Image: Quibi

    Quibi’s apps are now available for preorder on the App Store and Play Store, and they give a look at how the mobile streaming app might actually work when it launches on April 6th (via TechCrunch).

    Based on the renders in the listings, Quibi seems like it looks and feels like, well, a streaming video app. You can check out all of the available renders in the gallery below:

    Quibi tells The Verge that the screenshots in the listings were also shown at CES in January, but declined to say if the renders are what the final app will look like. But there are a few interesting details in them that are worth observing.

    When browsing content in the app, it looks like there will be four tabs on the bottom bar, labeled “For You,” “Browse,”…

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  • Bloomberg debate video would violate Twitter’s deepfake policy, but not Facebook’s

    Democratic Presidential Candidates Debate In Las Vegas Ahead Of Nevada CaucusesPhoto by Mario Tama/Getty Images

    As platforms prepare for the upcoming 2020 election season, Twitter and Facebook are divided on whether a video posted by the Mike Bloomberg presidential campaign would violate their policies on manipulated media.

    On Thursday, Bloomberg’s 2020 presidential campaign posted a video to Twitter that was edited to make it appear as though there was a long, embarrassing silence from Bloomberg’s Democratic opponents after he mentioned that he was the only candidate to have ever started a business during Wednesday night’s debate. Candidates like Sens. Bernie Sanders (I-VT), Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), and former South Bend, Indiana mayor Pete Buttigieg are shown searching for the words to respond to Bloomberg’s challenge.

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  • Twitch is making it easier to understand League of Legends matches

    Image: Twitch

    Twitch debuted a new extension for the League of Legends community this week, allowing viewers to keep track of streamers by displaying details on their overall performance in matches and how they use their favorite champions. League of Legends is famously complicated to watch (and play), and this tool could help to make the gameplay clearer to new audiences.

    If a League of Legends streamer installs the tracker, it will give viewers an interactive panel displaying the match’s scoreboard, the in-game artifacts they equip for their champions, and gameplay statistics such as how many kills or assists the streamer, their teammates, and members of the opposing team had during the match. In addition, the new extension also includes a match…

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  • Russia is meddling in 2020 campaign to help Trump, intelligence officials say

    NASCAR Cup Series 62nd Annual Daytona 500Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images

    Russia is already interfering in the 2020 campaign to help President Donald Trump toward reelection, according to a briefing given to the bipartisan House Intelligence Committee last week. The briefing, as reported in paired articles from The Washington Post and The New York Times, suggests many of the same tactics used in 2016 could be employed in the months to come, including troll campaigns and targeted hacking attempts.

    The day after the briefing was given, President Trump abruptly replaced his acting Director of National Intelligence Joseph Maguire, in what the Post describes as a direct response to the briefing. The Post is less clear on the contents of the briefing, but the Times reports from five different sources that the…

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  • Twitter’s upcoming manipulated media policy may include labels for ‘harmfully misleading’ tweets

    Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge

    A leaked Twitter demo showed that the platform is considering labeling tweets from politicians and other public figures if the tweets have lies or misinformation in them, NBC News reports. “Harmfully misleading” tweets would have red or orange labels applied, and include corrected information from fact-checkers, journalists, and other users in “one possible iteration” of a Wikipedia-like anti-misinformation effort Twitter plans to unveil March 5th, according to NBC News.

    The project is in the very early stages at Twitter, but a Twitter spokesperson says in an email to The Verge that the labeling system is a “design mockup for one option that would involve community feedback. Misinformation is a critical issue and we will be testing many…

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  • This is how Microsoft designed its new colorful Windows 10 icons

    The new Windows 10 icons.

    Microsoft has started rolling out new colorful app icons in Windows 10 today that overhaul the look and feel of the operating system. Changes to many of the built-in Windows 10 app icons have started rolling out today, but more are coming in the months ahead. It’s part of what the company describes as a “multi-year effort across Microsoft’s design teams to redesign our icons.”

    Windows has always suffered from a variety of different icons that are sometimes decades old, and Microsoft originally embarked on an effort to try to simplify some of these in Windows 10 when it first debuted nearly five years ago. Microsoft picked monochrome icons that were simplified but were designed for colorful Live Tiles that never really caught on with app…

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  • YouTube under fire for videos of journalist’s death

    Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge

    Nearly five years ago, reporter Alison Parker was murdered live on television. That video was clipped, published, and seen all across the internet over the years, including thousands of times on YouTube alone.

    On Thursday, Alison’s father Andy Parker filed a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission against Google, YouTube’s owner, alleging that the company’s handling of the content deceives consumers. Since Alison’s death, conspiracy theorists have reposted the video across the platform, presenting outlandish theories that have garnered hundreds of views online.

    “These videos have been edited in numerous ways—in almost every case to increase their shock value,” Parker’s complaint says. “Moreover, the users who perpetuate this type of…

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  • This disturbingly realistic deepfake puts Jeff Bezos and Elon Musk in a Star Trek episode

    A new deepfake puts Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos and Tesla CEO Elon Musk in the pilot episode of the original Star Trek, “The Cage” — and I kind of love it. In this particular AI-powered face swap, Bezos plays a Talosian alien with a huge bald head, while Musk plays Captain Christopher Pike (who is the captain of the USS Enterprise before James T. Kirk).

    Here’s a very short version of what’s going on in this scene, if you’re wondering: in this episode, the Talosian aliens capture Pike to enslave him and use him to breed humans that will be used to rebuild a destroyed society. Pike tries to escape throughout the episode, and eventually, the Talosians decide that humans’ resistance to captivity won’t make them a good fit for that plan.

    The…

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  • Eli Roth is directing a film adaptation of Borderlands

    Eli Roth’s announcement post for the Borderlands film adaptationEli Roth

    Director Eli Roth has signed onto a film adaptation of Gearbox’s Borderlands games, joining Chernobyl writer Craig Mazin and producers Avi and Ari Arad. Roth offered little detail about the project, which has been in the works since 2015. He celebrated the news by tweeting a picture of his face cropped onto one of Borderlands shirtless and heavily muscled “psycho” bandits.

    In a press release quoted by Deadline, Roth said he looks forward to “bringing [his] own energy, ideas, and vision to the wild, fun, and endlessly creative world of the game.” Lionsgate Motion Picture Group president Nathan Kahane elaborated that “with Eli’s vision and Craig’s screenplay, we believe we have cracked the code on bringing the anarchic world of B…

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  • Facebook will now pay you for your voice recordings

    Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge

    Facebook will offer to pay some users for voice recordings that will be used to help improve its speech recognition technology, the company announced Thursday. The move comes after Facebook — as well as Amazon, Apple, Google, and Microsoft — was caught listening to and transcribing voice recordings to improve speech recognition systems without informing customers it was doing so.

    Facebook will let you make voice recordings as part of a new program called “Pronunciations” in its Viewpoints market research app. If you qualify to be part of the program, Facebook says you’ll be able to record the phrase “Hey Portal” followed by the first name of a friend from your friends list. You’ll be able to do this with the names of up to 10 friends,…

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