Death Stranding and Zelda offer the clarity of hiking without the exhaustion

Blog & News Timeline View

  • Death Stranding and Zelda offer the clarity of hiking without the exhaustion

    Death Stranding

    We’re all stuck at home, so go for a virtual hike

    Continue reading…

  • How to convert a bookcase into a standing desk

    Working from home certainly has its perks: good coffee, pajamas all day, freedom to adjust the thermostat as you see fit. However, as you sit hunched over a small desk typing to your co-workers from your laptop, you may not notice the minutes passing by, but your back and neck certainly will. Whether you’re new to working from home because of recent company changes caused by the novel coronavirus or you’re accustomed to it already, it can be easy to forget to get up from that chair during the day.

    I’ve been a full-time remote employee for a while now, but before I made the switch to comfort-themed work attire, I had a desk in my company’s main office that could transition to standing height. I scoffed at the idea of needing a similar…

    Continue reading…

  • How coyotes made their homes in America‚Äôs cities

    collage of a coyote and a cityscapeIllustration by Alex Parkin

    Coyotes are not generally the first things that come to mind when you picture urban wildlife. Pigeons, rats, raccoons, squirrels — they’ve burrowed deeply into the ecosystems of cities. Urban humans are used to guarding their trash cans against raccoons, feeding pigeons in the park*, or running in terror from a defiant rat on the sidewalk. They all come with the territory.

    But across North America, coyotes have been staking their claim on cities as well. Decades of humans clearing forests and killing off apex predators like wolves helped coyotes expand their range across most of the continent, and they’ve proved remarkably adept at carving out territories within urban areas. Coyotes, like rats or raccoons, are generalists: their food and…

    Continue reading…

  • OnMail is a new privacy-focused email service from the company behind Edison Mail

    OnMail is a new email service from Edison (the company behind Edison Mail, one of the better email apps around). It’s described as “first permission-based email service” that’s designed to solve modern email problems, like endless spam and annoying emails from brands, and it’s Edison’s most ambitious attempt at fixing email yet.

    Edison’s been working to achieve similar results with its apps for years, but there’s a limit to what it can really do when it’s serving as an intermediary for other email services. Hence, OnMail: a new email provider that’s meant to compete with juggernauts like Gmail, Yahoo, Hotmail, Outlook, and the rest.

    The biggest feature is OnMail’s “Permission Control” system, which is built around the…

    Continue reading…